Tracheophytes

Tracheophytes clade

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Staphylea trifolia

Staphylea trifolia, a shrub native to the eastern United States and Canada, is one of only two species within the Staphyleaceae native to North America north of Mexico.  The other is S. bolanderi, a California endemic.  While the Staphyleaceae is relatively widespread, other families within the Crossosomatales are restricted in distribution.  The closest North American relatives to the Staphyleaceae  belong to the Crossosomataceae, and are distributed in the southwestern United States and Mexico. Read more »

Redbud

I found this redbud tree (Cercis canadensis) with a very large red bud!

Biological control of Euphorbia esula

Introduced to North America from Europe, Euphorbia esula (below) is now broadly established across the northwestern United States and adjacent Canada and continues to expand its range.

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Unusual plant coloration

Below is the typical white form of the non-photosynthetic, myco-heterotrophic Monotropa uniflora:

Here is an unusual pink-stemmed form of M. uniflora, found growing in a population of typical white plants.  Has anyone else seen something like this?

Show 2 older comments
Susan Tremblay

Check this one out:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Rouge_Monotropa.jpg

The article I saw about colors and populations turns out to be about the other species in that genus.

POPULATION GENETIC STRUCTURE OF THE MYCOHETEROTROPH MONOTROPA HYPOPITYS L. (ERICACEAE) AND DIFFERENTIATION BETWEEN RED AND YELLOW COLOR FORMS
Author(s): Klooster, M. R.; Culley, T. M.
Source: International Journal of Plant Sciences Volume: 171 Issue: 2 Pages: 167-174 Published: FEB 2010

btw I too have only ever seen all-white plants.

 

posted on 9:28 am, Jul 30, 2010
Thomas Madsen

Interesting paper!  Many have suspected that there is cryptic (or not so cryptic) diversity within Monotropa hypopitys, and this study seems to support that idea.

posted on 7:20 pm, Jul 30, 2010

Pinus strobus and Acer saccharum

Taxus canadensis

Asarum canadense

Arisaema dracontium

This aroid looks like it belongs in the tropics, but is actually native to eastern North America.

Pontederia cordata

Hibiscus leavis

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